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Aikido involves the WHOLE Body

Aikido involves the WHOLE Body

April 23, 2019 @ 6:11 pm
by Flo Li
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A student asked, “Osu! Sensei, sometimes in Aikido we unintentionally hurt our partner. What is the best way to avoid getting injured and avoid injuring our partner?”

Answer from Jacques Payet Shihan: “First, both instructors and students should remember that Aikido involves the whole body when applying and receiving the technique. Shite should not try to apply a movement to a particular part of the body. For example, don’t just apply a technique to the wrist. You must learn how to link from the wrist to the shoulder, to the hips, to the knees, and throughout uke’s body. So the technique is not just applied to the wrist but to the entire body and in turn the entire body is controlled. Now uke should not try to receive the technique with only his wrist (that is a weak joint and can be injured easily). Instead, uke must allow the energy to move from the wrist into his shoulder, into his hips, and into his knees to fill the whole body (that is a much stronger way to receive without shutting down parts of ourselves). Second, instructors need to step in and offer guidance to beginners and maybe remind more advanced students from time to time. Using your whole body as shite or uke is a key aikido principle – being ONE with the forces of nature as the giver and reciever, act as one entity, letting go our ideas of separation, and receive energy with our whole body instead of halfheartedly with only parts of ourselves. Last, remember aikido is not about making a technique work on someone else – that comes from the ego and it can quickly turn into heartless collision that will cause pain, frustrations, and injuries. Aikido is about bodies working together in unison – that comes from a deeper place with our inner strength and it holds the power to heal, bring joy and harmony without causing pain. Happy Training Everyone!”

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