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Aikido Wisdom / 7 posts found

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My Relationship with Aikido

May 9, 2016 @ 8:10 pm
by Flo Li
My Relationship with Aikido (by Lucia Evans) Aikido meaning the Power of Harmony, of all beings, all things working together. I asked the Universe for something that would help me move myself forward powerfully. The answer came back loud and clear. Aikido…. You need to practice Aikido. So for my birthday present last year 2015, I signed up for Aikido. I had had some exposure having taken my Son to it for a couple years, but I never actually invested time to experience it for myself. Aikido has changed my life. Really truly, I am so lucky that I listened [...]
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Aikido Had to Be Felt

May 1, 2012 @ 1:28 pm
by Flo Li
Aikido is often thought as mysterious for its effortless power. In Aikido, the goal is not to hurt another, but to unify with another in heart, mind, and energy. It takes a certain kind of discipline to train oneself to use such "soft" power. For practitioners, being able to feel and execute "soft" power is a source of joy and continuous learning. Today we would like to share with you an article written by Robert Mustard sensei (7th dan) about his experience while training in Japan under the house of Soke Gozo Shioda - the founder of Yoshinkan Aikido. It Had to [...]
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Aikido Ukemi Clinic – how to do a proper forward roll

November 16, 2011 @ 2:23 pm
by Flo Li
Most students have trouble with ukemi - especially when it comes to the forward roll. Some smaller children tend to put their head down to support their body. A few older kids do not maintain the strength in their body to remain round throughout the roll. Adults tend to deal with fears of "falling" might contract the body and can end up injuring themselves. We have published as few helpful hints and videos to help you safely practice the forward roll - [youtube=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShUFonrBErk] 1. you can swing your front arm over your head to initiate the circling movement of the [...]
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“Ki no Musubi – A Meeting of Minds” by Nev Sagiba

June 25, 2011 @ 3:24 pm
by Flo Li
    To Melanesians, being of “one mind,” means exactly that. And this is why the more heavily populated Niuginis never successfully invaded them for over 50,000 years of trying to do so. In principles of law, A Meeting of Minds (consensus ad idem) is the primary requirement for, and the definition of a contract. In natural thinking there can be seen what could be called a Divine Principle at work. A platoon who are indeed “of one mind” are invincible. That, united we stand and divided we fall, is more than a cliché. Where two or more are gathered [...]
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Who is the Most Important Person at the Dojo?

November 20, 2009 @ 2:00 pm
by aikidodelmarsensei
Go ahead and in your mind  choose a person or position at the dojo that you think is the most important one. I suggest to you it is the person that just joined today— the new person that took the plunge to begin something new, maybe even scary and intimidating. The new student doesn’t know much, if anything about Aikido,,and they are aware that they don’t know! They have what the Japanese call “shoshin”, translated as “white-belt mind” or “beginner’s mind”. They bring this precious state of mind into the dojo for all to witness and appreciate. Their courage and [...]

What do YOU do when you make a mistake?

August 26, 2009 @ 9:36 am
by Flo Li
(Note: A topic came up in class the other night and it was worth writing about it so everyone that wasn't in class can also profit from it and learn more about the Art of Peace- Aikido.) We’ve seen it a million times- both with others and ourselves. I saw it the other night in class, a student was involved in a series of cuts with his sword and he made a mistake. That he made a mistake was not a big deal, he’s as human as you and me. What is important is the response to the mistake. As [...]

Yoshinkan Aikido Overview

June 9, 2009 @ 7:44 pm
by Flo Li
Morihei Uyeshiba (1883-1968) became a recognized master of aiki-jujutsu and several other arts. As he matured he became a strong proponent of non-aggression. In 1925, he organized a style of budo ("the way of the warrior") to assist his own spiritual and physical development. The result was modern Aikido. The word Aikido is actually three Japanese words AI, KI, and DO that broadly translated means the "way" (DO) of "harmony" (AI) with the "forces of nature" (KI). Aikido is not a conventional fighting art or sport. There are never competitions or tournaments, instead, it is a martial art, which develops [...]