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Aikido Wisdom / 14 posts found

“Ki no Musubi – A Meeting of Minds” by Nev Sagiba

June 25, 2011 @ 3:24 pm
by Flo Li
    To Melanesians, being of “one mind,” means exactly that. And this is why the more heavily populated Niuginis never successfully invaded them for over 50,000 years of trying to do so. In principles of law, A Meeting of Minds (consensus ad idem) is the primary requirement for, and the definition of a contract. In natural thinking there can be seen what could be called a Divine Principle at work. A platoon who are indeed “of one mind” are invincible. That, united we stand and divided we fall, is more than a cliché. Where two or more are gathered [...]

Who is the Most Important Person at the Dojo?

November 20, 2009 @ 2:00 pm
by aikidodelmarsensei
Go ahead and in your mind  choose a person or position at the dojo that you think is the most important one. I suggest to you it is the person that just joined today— the new person that took the plunge to begin something new, maybe even scary and intimidating. The new student doesn’t know much, if anything about Aikido,,and they are aware that they don’t know! They have what the Japanese call “shoshin”, translated as “white-belt mind” or “beginner’s mind”. They bring this precious state of mind into the dojo for all to witness and appreciate. Their courage and [...]

What do YOU do when you make a mistake?

August 26, 2009 @ 9:36 am
by Flo Li
(Note: A topic came up in class the other night and it was worth writing about it so everyone that wasn't in class can also profit from it and learn more about the Art of Peace- Aikido.) We’ve seen it a million times- both with others and ourselves. I saw it the other night in class, a student was involved in a series of cuts with his sword and he made a mistake. That he made a mistake was not a big deal, he’s as human as you and me. What is important is the response to the mistake. As [...]

Yoshinkan Aikido Overview

June 9, 2009 @ 7:44 pm
by Flo Li
Morihei Uyeshiba (1883-1968) became a recognized master of aiki-jujutsu and several other arts. As he matured he became a strong proponent of non-aggression. In 1925, he organized a style of budo ("the way of the warrior") to assist his own spiritual and physical development. The result was modern Aikido. The word Aikido is actually three Japanese words AI, KI, and DO that broadly translated means the "way" (DO) of "harmony" (AI) with the "forces of nature" (KI). Aikido is not a conventional fighting art or sport. There are never competitions or tournaments, instead, it is a martial art, which develops [...]